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Grand Prismatic Hot Spring
Grand Prismatic Spring, blue water, orange water, thermophiles, bacteria, colorful, midway geyser basin, Yellowstone National Park, thermal feature, deep pool, hot spring, biggest, deepest, pretty, amazing, geology, volcano,
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Grand Prismatic Hot Spring •  Grand Prismatice spring is an interesting and amazing chunk of geology. It located in Midway Geyser Basin, has the distinction of being the park's largest hot spring. It measures approximately 370 feet in diameter and is over 121 feet deep. The spring is so large and hot, the steam makes it near impossible to get a photo from the edge of the spring, this image was taken from a hill above.

Thermophiles of Grand Prismatic Spring, orange
Spring level at Grand Prismatic Spring

A description of this spring by fur trapper Osborne Russell in 1839 also makes it the earliest described thermal feature in Yellowstone that is definitely identifiable. Osborne described it; "The enormous pool is not only huge; it's colorful. Notice the steam that is suspended in the air directly above the large spring. The steam reflects the colors of the rainbow." Osborne Russell was the only known articulate trapper who wrote about his travels.

It's not hard to find natural wonders within Yellowstone National Park, but the park's largest hot spring might be the most remarkable, and not just for its size: dubbed the Grand Prismatic Spring, the hot spring radiates extremely hot water—and stunning prismatic color—from its center.

"Prismatic"?  The root word is prism. Isaac Newton established that refraction causes white light to separate into its constituent wavelengths. While he was not the first to demonstrate that a prism produces a spectrum of colored light from incident white light. Prisms can be used to break light up into its constituent spectral colors (the colors of the rainbow) and are sometimes used to instruct about the nature of light; hence, the name.

Water at the center of the spring, which bubbles up 121 feet from underground chambers, can reach temperatures around 189 degrees Fahrenheit, which makes it too hot to sustain most life (some life does manage to exist, but its limited to organisms that feed off of inorganic chemicals like hydrogen gas). Because there's very little living in the center of the pool, the water looks extremely clear, and has a beautiful, deep-blue color (thanks to the scattering of blue wavelengths—the same reason oceans and lakes appear blue to the naked eye). But as the water spreads out and cools, it creates concentric circles of varying temperatures—like a stacking matryoshka doll, if each doll signified a different temperature. And these distinct temperature rings are key, because each ring creates a very different environment inhabited by different types of bacteria. And it's the different types of bacteria that give the spring its prismatic colors.

Researchers, scientists, Thermophile, Yellowstone National Park
Thermoophile Reasearchers

The Hayden Expedition in 1871 named this spring because of its beautiful coloration, and artist Thomas Moran made water-color sketches depicting its rainbow-like colors. The sketches seemed exaggerations and geologist A.C. Peale returned in 1878 to verify the colors. The colors begin with a deep blue center followed by pale blue. Green algae forms beyond the shallow edge. Outside the scalloped rim a band of yellow fades into orange. Red then marks the outer border. Steam often shrouds the spring which reflects the brilliant colors. Grand Prismatic discharges an estimated 560 gallons per minute. It is considered to be the third largest in the world-New Zealand has the two largest springs

After this explanation, you have to buy the photo :)

• Product information

Traditional Fine Art Prints • I have all fine art prints printed at Bay Photo, an internationally known custom color lab.  After printing, Bay Photo ships the print to me for inspection and signing, I then ship them along to you. This takes awhile, be patient.

I spec them on “Moab’s  Lasal Exhibition Luster” photo paper. This paper weighs in at a healthy 300gsm, ideal for gallery and exhibition prints, the new fourth-generation coating ensures the highest possible d-max and color holdout. With product names like Entrada, Colorado, and Lasal its easy to see the source of inspiration for Legion Paper's Moab brand. Created in Moab, UT surrounded by the endless red rock wonders of Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, the Colorado River, and the LaSal Mountains, the Moab line of archival, digital imaging papers continues to rely on that inspiration to design premium solutions for digital photographers and artists.

Your paper print product will come pre-mounted on 3/16" Gator Foamboard, a very rigid, durable, and lightweight backing that will not warp, the premium backing for fine art prints. Having messed up prints myself putting them on mountaing board you will appreciate the extra effort and expanese.

 

 

MetalPrints - Stunning Prints on Aluminum in Sizes up to 4x8' MetalPrints™ represent a new art medium for preserving photos by infusing dyes directly into specially coated aluminum sheets. Your images will take on an almost magical luminescence. You've never seen a more brilliant and impressive print! Colors are vibrant and the luminescence is breathtaking. Detail and resolution are unsurpassed.